These Dreams Inside Blur Reality's Lines

easyobsession:

laugh-dance-ellen:

Yet another example as to why Ellen is my role model.

In 1997, Ellen came out as gay on her sitcom, Ellen. She was met with a horrendous amount of backlash from society and the media. She was the butt of every joke on late night TV. She was dubbed “Ellen DeGenerate.” She even received death threats. 

Ellen went from the most popular sitcom actress to the most hated. Desperate, she turned to the gay community for support. However, Chastity Bono, a fellow lesbian and a representative for GLAAD at the time, betrayed Ellen, telling Variety Magazine, “[‘Ellen’] is so gay it’s excluding a large part of our society … we have to be realistic. This is network primetime.” 

Ellen trusted Chastity to help as she was also gay, and would understand what Ellen was going through. Instead, Chastity publicly denounced Ellen, leaving Ellen alone to defend herself. Ellen’s show was subsequently cancelled. 

Flash forward to 2011. Chastity Bono is now Chaz Bono, a transgender male. He is going to be a contestant of Dancing with the Stars, much to the displeasure of the public. He receives backlash, similar to the kind Ellen endured in 1997. In response, Ellen defends Chaz in her monologue (seen here), and invites Chaz on her show to give his perspective. 

Ellen chose to help Chaz, who was being persecuted by the media, even though he had hurt Ellen severely in the past. Ellen definitely did not have to have Chaz on her show, but she did to be kind. Ellen not only forgave Chaz, but gave him the support that he failed to give her earlier. 

Be kind to one another. It’s not just something Ellen says after every show; it’s what she lives by. And we should all try to live by it too. 

"I don’t understand algebra, but that doesn’t mean it’s wrong."

This woman needs to be president. 



Big mission. Lots to do. Better get to it.

Big mission. Lots to do. Better get to it.


theashlz:

A Tour of a Cinderella Castle Suite

Want to stay the night there so bad.


Disney Parks


moosecannoncop:

trying to sing both parts in a disney song like

A WHOLE NEW WORLdon’t you dare close your eyes

A HUNDRED THOUShold your breath it gets better

I’M LIKE A SHOOTING STAR, I’VE COME SO FAR, I CAN’T GO BACK TO WHEREa whole new wooorrlllEVERY TURN A SURPRIwith new horizonEVERY MOMENT GETS BETTER


zerogravija:

Power sleeps within you. If you give it form it will give you strength

DIVE TO THE HEART POSTERS (CLICK FOR FULL SIZE)

make me choose: goodbyehenry asked ↴
next to normal or legally blonde: the musical


youngcasanovab:

taint3ed:

I’M FUCKING SCREAMING LMAOOO

😂😂😂

youngcasanovab:

taint3ed:

I’M FUCKING SCREAMING LMAOOO

😂😂😂


sparklevamp:

chatterboxrose:

dallonsmiles:

ryansgayliner:

the thrilling saga in which Panic! owns the fuck out of WBC

A+ handling of the situation

Lest us forget that their opening band is also owning: 

image

BAM that’s how we do it!


tranqualizer:

mayosjustanickname:

diasporicdecay:

pocketostars:

ancientrelic:

humansofnewyork:

“After this I go to work at a pizza shop. My wife and I were college professors in Bangladesh. I taught accounting. But one dollar in America becomes eighty dollars when we send it back home.”

People forget, when immigrants come to this country they start from scratch. They could have been lawyers in their home country, but in the US..it means nothing. You think a HS diploma from Bangladesh means anything in this country? My mom was a top student in the country, went to all the best school and got the best of everything…but when she got here it meant squat and she was cleaning other people’s homes and scrubbing their toilets. This is why I get pissed of when people talk smack about immigrants. They at least are doing something…..heading for a goal..making sacrifices…what are you doing with your life? 

^ My parents were college-educated teachers in their home country and came to the U.S. with nothing but empty pockets, a dash of hope, and a belief in God. They also scrubbed toilets in people’s homes to make enough to provide for their children, and that’s probably not something a lot of educated professionals would be able to do. I know I wouldn’t be able to do it. Pride would get in the way.

THIS IS TOO IMPORTANT.

Shoutout to my parents

and you know, shout out to our im/migrant parents who were not college educated before they came to the U.S and don’t share a narrative of going from “riches to rags.” shout out to my im/migrant parents who were laborers at home and are still laborers here.
i think it’s important to honor the complexities of our parents histories and uplift their triumphs but let’s remember to do so in a way that honors all of the ways im/migrants exist and all of the places we and our parents come from. we don’t have to prove that capitalism, white supremacy, classism, etc is awful because our parents were once revered college professors or doctors. we don’t have to believe in that assimilation. 

tranqualizer:

mayosjustanickname:

diasporicdecay:

pocketostars:

ancientrelic:

humansofnewyork:

“After this I go to work at a pizza shop. My wife and I were college professors in Bangladesh. I taught accounting. But one dollar in America becomes eighty dollars when we send it back home.”

People forget, when immigrants come to this country they start from scratch. They could have been lawyers in their home country, but in the US..it means nothing. You think a HS diploma from Bangladesh means anything in this country? My mom was a top student in the country, went to all the best school and got the best of everything…but when she got here it meant squat and she was cleaning other people’s homes and scrubbing their toilets. This is why I get pissed of when people talk smack about immigrants. They at least are doing something…..heading for a goal..making sacrifices…what are you doing with your life? 

^ My parents were college-educated teachers in their home country and came to the U.S. with nothing but empty pockets, a dash of hope, and a belief in God. They also scrubbed toilets in people’s homes to make enough to provide for their children, and that’s probably not something a lot of educated professionals would be able to do. I know I wouldn’t be able to do it. Pride would get in the way.

THIS IS TOO IMPORTANT.

Shoutout to my parents

and you know, shout out to our im/migrant parents who were not college educated before they came to the U.S and don’t share a narrative of going from “riches to rags.” shout out to my im/migrant parents who were laborers at home and are still laborers here.

i think it’s important to honor the complexities of our parents histories and uplift their triumphs but let’s remember to do so in a way that honors all of the ways im/migrants exist and all of the places we and our parents come from. we don’t have to prove that capitalism, white supremacy, classism, etc is awful because our parents were once revered college professors or doctors. we don’t have to believe in that assimilation.